Grammatica officinalis – Marie Andersson

Grammatica officinalis – Marie Andersson

Opening March 17, at 17-20
Artist talk with Marie Andersson Thursday, March 30 at 18.30
The exhibitions is open March 18 – April 30 2017

.

In her art work, Marie Andersson is looking back in history and seeks fragments of that which no longer exist or never happened. In the border between imagination and reality she explores a new way of seeing time, memory and space. Past, present and future exist simultaneously in an unimpeded flow and loosens up what we usually refer to as the present. With an experimental method Andersson often use philosophical theories and historical places as her starting point. She explores previously dismissed ideas and presents the results along with documentation of their own personal experiences.

The work Chateaux disparus began when Andersson found a map of Paris, where six castles that no longer exists was marked. The castles had for various reasons been demolished and eventually disappeared from people’s consciousness. During six days, she visited the places where the castles once stood. She spent one day at each place and made there twelve photographs, three for each direction. Like a scientist seeking physical evidence from the past, Andersson is looking with her camera to find remnants of the castles existence. At each place, she also noted her thoughts in a notebook. She writes, among other things about the observations that only can be experienced the first time you visit a place and trying to capture the inner essence.

In the late 19th century a new meteorological theory appeared which argued that there is one single set of clouds that regularly circulates around the Earth. The same cloud can therefore be observed in one place and three years later pop up in another. Also the Swedish author, playwright and artist August Strindberg was interested in this theory. In Andersson’s works Celestografi (Celestograph) she continues the investigation by charting the connections and regularity of the clouds. The studies are made in both Malmö and Paris and has been going on for several years. The pieces in Celestografi is placed in a large grid made of warning tape on the gallery floor. As a floor plan or a map in the scale of 1:1, she’s once again relating to historical places, this time to [format]s gallery space which originally was a factory.

In the work Punctum Andersson has used the photographic term “punctum” to investigate whether it also can be applied to a site-specific situation. The term was coined by the author Roland Barthes in the book Camera Lucida: Reflection on photography (1980). In an effort to find new methods to analyze and discuss photography, punctum came to stand for details in the photograph that connects to our emotions. It can for instance be items that are familiar from the childhood, and the punctum is always individual. Andersson is also wondering if a place may contain details that attract the visitors emotions? Are there architectural elements that make people return? At the places where the castles once stood, Andersson has photographed the punctum she finds in the architecture of the city.

.

Marie Andersson (b. 1962) lives and works in Malmö. She studied at Grafikskolan Forum 1992-1995 and took her master’s degree at Malmö Art Academy between 1995-1997. Her work has been shown in solo exhibitions at Ystad Art Museum (2013) and Hasselblad Center, Gothenburg (2011), among others. In 2013 she participated in the group exhibition De synliga (The visible) at Artipelag, Stockholm. She has been rewarded with project grants from the Swedish Arts Grants Committee four times (2000, 2003, 2008 and 2013) and can be found represented at the Moderna Museet in Stockholm, Statens Konstråd and Musem of Arts in Gothenburg.

.

With support from Mediaverkstaden